Monday, January 30, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 30 January 2017

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.
This Week in Canadian History  

Flag of Quebec 

The provincial flag of Quebec was first hoisted on 21 January 1948. Quebec Flag Day, however, is celebrated on 24 May.

The flag contains white fleurs-de-lis on a blue field (which is colour Pantone 293). The flag's horizontal symmetry allows both sides of the flag to show the same image.

To read the history of the flag, and other interesting tidbits, go to

Social Media

(Video) Saskatoon Heritage Society hopeful Third Avenue United Church gets designation

The Saskatoon Heritage Society is hopeful a provincial board will recommend the Third Avenue United Church be designated a municipal heritage property.

The church at 304 3rd Ave. North, which first saw construction in 1911, was up for consideration during a Monday evening meeting of city council.

(Video) Calgary’s Langevin Bridge renamed Reconciliation Bridge

Calgary city council voted to rename the Langevin Bridge as the Reconciliation Bridge Monday evening, with only Coun. Jim Stevenson opposed.

The bridge, which opened in 1910, spans the Bow River, connecting 4 Street S.E. with 4 Avenue S.E. 

(Blog) Protecting Fort Anne – One of Canada’s First Parks 

Fort Anne National Historic Site in Annapolis Royal sits at the edge of the Annapolis and Allain Rivers in Nova Scotia. The park, established 100 years ago, is Canada’s first federally-administered national historic site (Fort Howe in New Brunswick is the first historic site).
(Video) Calls to rename Ottawa’s Langevin Block over namesake’s connection to residential schools

A recent decision to rename Calgary’s Langevin Bridge because of its namesake’s connection to residential schools is spurring calls to change the name of the building in Ottawa that houses the Prime Minister’s Office.

Newspapers Articles


Company's test for Beothuk DNA called bogus by geneticists

A North Carolina woman says DNA testing has revealed that she is Beothuk, a descendant of an Indigenous people from Newfoundland whose last known member died in 1829. 

Nova Scotia 

Coin, stamp to mark 100th anniversary of Halifax Explosion

A newly-minted $100 coin and a 2017 Canada Post stamp will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Halifax Explosion.

Pre-orders are being taken for the $100 gold coin designed by Canadian artist Jamie Desrochers, which is expected to be popular among collectors after its Feb. 7 release. 

The past, present and future will all be celebrated during this year’s African Heritage Month, which will be given an official launch in Amherst on Monday, Jan. 30.

Members of New Brunswick’s black community say the time has come to bury a word once used in polite company, but is now considered offensive.

The word “Negro" is still being used as a name for roads, neighbourhoods and historic breakwater in the province.

STORIFY: African Heritage Month officially declared at Province House

Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant and African Nova Scotia Affairs Minister Tony Ince officially named February African Heritage Month at Province House Tuesday.

This year’s theme, “Passing the Torch — African Nova Scotians and the Next 150 Years,” recognizes the long history of African Nova Scotians, and documents their resiliency and triumphs in the face of adversity. The theme also highlights the African Nova Scotian community’s future. 

Exhibition depicts Canada's prime ministers with majesty and mischief

It’s John Diefenbaker as you’ve never seen him — standing on a chair, an intricate miniature statue of the 13th prime minister in a quirky exhibition that captures 150 years of Canadian political history.

Federal funds announced for Freeport legion, Cornwallis military museum

West Nova MP Colin Fraser has announced federal funding to help Royal Canadian Legion Carpiquet Branch 92, which received $81,450, and the Cornwallis Military Museum Association, which got $5,357. 

Volunteers revive historic cabin in the heart of Nova Scotia wilderness 

It was the ultimate backwoods fixer-upper.

A dedicated group of Nova Scotians has worked to restore a nearly century-old log cabin deep in the woods of southwest Nova Scotia that's considered part of the province's heritage. 

New Brunswick

‘It's derogatory’: Black History Society pushing to remove ‘Negro’ from N.B. community names

Members of New Brunswick’s black community say the time has come to bury a word once used in polite company, but is now considered offensive.

The word “Negro" is still being used as a name for roads, neighbourhoods and historic breakwater in the province.  

Saint John's racist place names need to change, group says

Several New Brunswick place names — like the Negro Point Breakwater in west Saint John, and Negro Head in Lorneville — are reminders of the province's racist heritage and should be changed, according to Ralph Thomas of PRUDE.

'It's ... insulting': Mi'kmaq warrior chief says of Canada's 150th celebration

As Canada celebrates its 150th year of Confederation, Mi'kmaq Warrior Chief John Levi says First Nations people are still struggling with poverty and he's made a call to action to remind the country of its shortcomings.  


A story a day to celebrate Black History Month

While Black people make up 2.9 per cent of the Canadian population, according to the 2011 Statistics Canada numbers, Casey Palmer believes most of what’s reported in mainstream media isn’t necessarily reflective of his actual community.

Ryan Gosling and a brief history of Canadian actors at the Oscars

So with our fingers firmly crossed for Gosling come next month (his hometown of London, Ont. might be something of a good luck charm, as you'll quickly see), let's take a quick look back at the 19 Canadian-born actors that join him in the all-too-exclusive club.

Join in this city’s year-long party

Jim Watson, the mayor of Canada’s capital, joined the Ottawa 2017 briefing in progress. He talked about the city he clearly loves and currently runs, sounded excited, then handed the reporter a puck.

“Most mayors hand out medals,” he said. “But I hand out pucks. So there you go …”

Canada history: Jan 26, 1924 Canada’s first (more or less) official flag

Canada has an interesting history with its national flags.

Canada came into being in 1867 and usually when a country is formed, one of the first things it does is create a flag as part of its new and distinct identity. That didn’t exactly happen in the Dominion of Canada.

Searching for a Canadian soldier: Belgian woman makes last-ditch effort to find her father

A Belgian woman's plea for help to find the Canadian soldier she thinks is her biological father has captured the attention of thousands of people around the world, prompting Canadians to dig into the military pasts of their own families and to scour archival websites to try to solve the mystery 


Former church owner objects to heritage status

A provincial review board will consider granting a heritage designation for Third Avenue United Church in Saskatoon after its former owner objected to granting protection for the historic building.


A step in time: Square Dance Club history

Whether country and western, polka or tango, community dancing has been enjoyed as a pastime in Lethbridge for generations.

In the early 1950s square dancing soared in popularity. An estimated 1,500 people in Lethbridge belonged to a club, and the waiting period for admission to membership into one of the city’s clubs was as much as a year.

Canada Stories this Week 

Soldiers of the Great War: The Fredericton Soldier Biography History Initiative
The introduction says that “The Fredericton Soldier Biography History Initiative brings together middle school students from George Street Middle School with educators, historians, archivists, and community members to help build greater awareness of soldiers named on the Fredericton Cenotaph and their families. It is also the goal of the project to highlight the historic complexities of New Brunswick societies during the Great War period, including the experiences of women, First Nations, African Canadians, and immigrant populations”.

If you go to the Name Index at, you will see the names of soldiers with background information, and war experience.

The website of the New Brunswick Archives is

Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2017 Social Media Team
So we received word from the Ontario Genealogical Society conference that we have been named as a member of the Ontario Genealogical Society's Social Media Team to the conference in June 16 to 18, 2017. What an honour!

Do you know that this is the first time the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference has had a Social Media Team?

So we, along with other bloggers, have been tasked with the responsibility of telling our readers about the conference, and we will be there at the conference telling you what is going on. 

So stayed tuned. We will be your place for news on the conference. 

To read more about the conference, go to

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to The email is 

(c)2017 All rights reserved.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 23 January 2017

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History
Superman - Man of Steel

On 16 January 1939, Joe Shuster from Toronto publishes his first self-titled Superman comic strip - the Man of Steel had been a character in Action Comics. New York. New York. 

The "man of steel" hid his extraordinary strength, speed, and superhuman powers under the self-effacing guise of the weak and clumsy Clark Kent. 

For more information, read

Lorne Greene - Canadian actor 
Lorne Greene, the Canadian actor from my adapted hometown, Ottawa, starred as the lead in Bonanza, a TV series set on the Ponderosa Ranch in Nevada.

He played family patriarch and three-time widower Ben Cartwright, with his three sons (each by a different mother, by the way – and this would be of interest to genealogists) - Adam (Pernell Roberts), Hoss (Dan Blocker) and Little Joe (Michael Landon).

For more information, go to

Social Media

(Photos) Retired doctor paints Gander’s past

When most people think of Gander, they think of planes. But when artist Clayton Hann is working on one of his watercolours, he looks past the planes, to the trains that made building the town possible. 

Newspaper Articles

Nova Scotia

Wolfville honours war heroine

Wolfville is commemorating war heroine Mona Parsons by erecting a bronze statue of her near the town’s post office.

Plans are being made to erect the statue of Parsons, created by Dutch sculptor Nistal Prem de Boer, on the anniversary of VE Day in May.

Local author and history buff pens new book about local family

One of East Hants’ most prominent names in their history is the topic of John “Jack” Hawkins latest book.

“This book is a brief account of the life of Jabob Horne and some of his descendants, ” said Hawkins. ” Over the years I have been given records and information on Jacob and the early settlers. Mary Horne Knotling or Oregon has done a lot of research and passed it along to me.” 

Halifax Explosion plaque tells wrong story for 17 years

For 17 years, a plaque at the Halifax Explosion memorial site in Fort Needham park has told passersby about the disaster that rocked the port city on Dec. 6, 1917.

"Reversing her engines, Mont-Blanc went astern to pull out the deep gash in Imo's side," the plaque reads.

"Steel rasped against ragged steel, sparks flew, Mont-Blanc caught fire and blew up at 9:04:35 a.m."

The trouble is that the plaque has the story wrong. 

New Brunswick 

Port Saint John: Canada's next National Historic Seaport?

The majority of Saint Johners don't visit Martello Tower, Fort LaTour or Partridge Island — but local historian Harold Wright is hoping to change that.

Sites like Fort Howe, Fort LaTour and Partridge Island "tell our story," Wright said.
Rustico priest had first automobile in Canada 150 years ago

December marked the 150th anniversary of the first automobile arriving in Canada, before the country was even officially formed, a steam-powered carriage that was imported by Father George A. Belcourt.

Prince Edward Island 

New Brunswick’s 2017 slogan not sitting well with some P.E.I. Politicians

A wee bit of a tiff is developing between P.E.I. and New Brunswick over which province planted the seed for Confederation.


A beauty pageant of the sea is coming to Quebec City, river

As the story goes, the training ship Amerigo Vespucci was sailing the Mediterranean in 1962 when the U.S. aircraft carrier Independence spotted it and radioed: "Who are you?" Came the reply: "School ship Amerigo Vespucci, the Italian Navy." The Independence answered: "You are the most beautiful ship in the world." 


Burlington Heritage Fair celebrates Canada 150 on Feb. 4

Residents may feel more nostalgic at this year’s Burlington Heritage Fair as the 2017 theme will celebrate Canada 150 and the history of sports in the city.

The free family event is the official kick off for Heritage Month (February) and is hosted by the Heritage Month Committee and Heritage Burlington. 

Canada Post: celebrating Canadian UNESCO sites

­Canada post has released five new stamps. The stamps show fascinating world heritage sites as named by UNESCO, so declared for their importance to world history and heritage 

The community archives has had a record number of new historical documents flooding in. 

Curious locals can now wander into the Community Archives of Belleville and Hastings County and unearth circa 1800s details about taxes paid and prisoner treatment. 

Museum of History acquires 'Canadian Caper' collection

Most Canadians who were around in the 1980s have vivid memories of the so-called Canadian Caper, an audacious rescue of six U.S. diplomats during the Iran hostage crisis.  


Nominations requested for annual historical preservation award

Lt.-Gov. Janice Filmon is encouraging the public to nominate a worthy Manitoban who has provided prolonged and meritorious service in the preservation and promotion of Manitoba history for an award, presented in consultation with the Manitoba Historical Society. 


Museum honours 150 years of Canada

Fascinating facts and intriguing stories about Okotoks’ unique history will fill the Okotoks Museum and Archives in a year-long devotion to a Canadian milestone.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, the museum is displaying facts and stories that reflect numerous aspects of the community since the nation’s confederation in an exhibit entitled Our Place in History.

Pictures: art contest celebrates Alberta's Ukrainian heritage

Six Alberta students were recognized Friday for their artwork showing 125 years of Ukrainian settlement in Canada.

The ‘We Became a Part of Canada’ art contest got students across the province to look at how Ukrainian-Canadian migrants became part of Alberta 

British Columbia

Province launching a funding program for museums, heritage sites

This program offers one-time grants of up to $100,000 for; developing infrastructure to improve museum spaces and facilities; conserving historic places and heritage sites; building lasting legacies with projects that physically represent B.C.’s unique and diverse histories, culture and heritage such as exhibitions, public art or statues; and sharing history through projects that promote sharing of collections and expertise between the Royal B.C. Museum and the wider museum community.

British Columbia

Central Saanich heritage home to be moved for development

The first purpose-built affordable housing to come to Central Saanich since the 1960s will blend history and access, proponents say.

The project on West Saanich Road in Brentwood Bay will see a heritage home moved to make way for 40 affordable rental apartments and six for-purchase townhomes.

Metlakatla First Nation working on plan to protect heritage, language
Dozens of Metlakatla First Nation members are meeting in Prince Rupert, B.C. this weekend to find ways to preserve and pass down their culture, history and language.

Allowing future generations to connect with their roots as well as protecting sites of cultural significance will be the goals of a new cultural program from the Nation," said Metlakatla communications manager Shaun Thomas.

Canada Stories this Week 

First World War

387,710 of 640,000 files are available online in the Personnel Records of the First World War database at Library and Archives Canada.

They say that the ' digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order. Please note that over the years, the content of some boxes has had to be moved and you might find that the file you want, with a surname that is supposed to have been digitized, is now located in another box that has not yet been digitized'

So far, they have digitized the following files - Latest box digitized: Box 6526 and last name Murray.

Please check the database regularly for new additions, and if you still have questions after checking the database, you may contact us directly at 1-866-578-7777 for more assistance.

For more information, go to 

A legacy carved in stone

There is going to be an exhibit at the Museum of War which I will try to go and see, and it's the Preserved in Stone – Underground Art of the First World War. The exhibit will be on from October 17, 2016 – January 7, 2018 and it's right inside the lobby, so it's easy to get to right beside the front door.

In the shadow of the Vimy Memorial in France lies a Celtic cross carved in soft stone. Both are monuments to Canadian soldiers who died in the First World War. But while one looms solemnly over the French countryside, the other is hidden in a cave beneath a farmer’s field.

A Celtic Cross is a highlight of Preserved in Stone – Underground Art of the First World War. The exhibition of photographs and 3D reproductions of artwork and graffiti left behind by Canadian troops preparing for the Battle of Vimy Ridge in 1917.

And if you are coming to Ottawa during the Ontario Genealogical 2017 Conference, you can take advantage of the tours that are available, and one of the tours is of the Museum of War, so you can make reservations now at

Canadian War Museum is 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to The email is

(c)2017 All rights reserved.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 16 January 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

“Father of Confederation” is born 

On 11 January 1815, John A Macdonald was born in Scotland, and in 1820, the family emigrated to Kingston, Ontario where they joined a number of family members, who had immigrated earlier.

He died in 1891 from the effects of a stroke, and was buried in Kingston.

Canadian held a number of birthday parties on Saturday, and one of them was held on the Natrel skating rink in Old Montreal on Saturday afternoon.

Read about it at

The Fuller Brush Man 

On 13 January 1885, Alfred C. Fuller from Nova Scotia was born, and he started the Fuller Brush Company after he moved to Hartford, Connecticut in 1906. 

It was a door-to-door company, and I remember as a child, salesmen coming to our house selling personal care as well as commercial and household cleaning products.

For more information, go to 

To see his home in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, go to the s

Social Media 

Video: Union Point Church: History and heart along Highway 75

For drivers heading down Highway 75 to the American border, there's one welcome sign they are headed in the right direction — a tiny white church perched between two lanes of high-speed traffic.

But how did it end up perched so precariously? The answer dates back to the days of steamboats and river travel. 

Newspaper Articles 

Nova Scotia

Hants History: Jan. 9, 2017 edition

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal

Don't leave Lunenburg in the lurch, mayor urges feds eyeing new heritage sites

Before the federal government accepts nominations for a new slew of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the mayor of Lunenburg says it should provide more support for those it already has.

Rachel Bailey says Old Town Lunenburg's designation has been very much a blessing, raising the town's profile not only provincially, but nationally and worldwide.

Prince Edward Island

Heritage group hopes to preserve historic estate, brick by brick

The heritage trust trying to preserve the Glenaladale estate, built in the late 1880s in Tracadie Bay, has launched a Buy a Brick campaign to encourage Islanders to invest in the property.

The group says it has until March 31 to raise another $700,000 it needs to buy the three-storey brick home, which it hopes to turn into a small conference/ education centre. 

Why P.E.I. is celebrating 150 years — again and again

Yes, it was just two years ago that P.E.I. wrapped up a year of exhaustive province-wide celebrations on which federal, provincial and municipal governments collectively spent $26 million and 161 community groups partied with the nearly $5 million from the P.E.I. 2014 Fund — so Islanders can be forgiven for a bit of dejà vu when they hear that Canada is celebrating 150 years of nationhood in 2017.


From the archives: Success of ice railway to South Shore in 1880 was short lived

It was one of the most bizarre rail accidents in Montreal’s history and also one of the least auspicious. Bizarre, because the rails were laid not on terra firma but on ice across the frozen St. Lawrence. And inauspicious, because the accident came on the very first day of operations that winter. 


Scientists map beaver genome as gift for Canada's 150th birthday

Throughout Canada's history, the industrious, humble beaver has gone from near-extinction at the height of the fur trade to becoming the official symbol of our nation.

Now, Canadian researchers are hoping that the furry rodent can also become a science hero by helping them better understand human disorders like autism.

Dufferin County offering funds for Canada 150 events, legacy projects

Municipalities planning something special for this year’s Canada 150th celebration may be eligible for funding from Dufferin County.

Kicking off Canada 150

Springwater is kicking off its Canada 150 Celebrations with a new art exhibit at the Township Administration Centre.

The Canada 150 Maple Leaf Mosaic was created by the BaySide Artists and features sixteen 12”x12” paintings of Canadian historical figures and events. The paintings are designed to be hung together as a mosaic of the Canadian flag, and each panel commemorates one aspect of Canada’s rich history from landmarks, to people, to moments in time.


Nominees Sought For Manitoba Historical Preservation Efforts

Lt.-Gov. Janice Filmon is encouraging the public to nominate a worthy Manitoban who has provided prolonged and meritorious service in the preservation and promotion of Manitoba history for an award, presented in consultation with the Manitoba Historical Society.

Celebrating the 150th anniversary in St. Boniface

The building which Le Musée de Saint-Boniface Museum currently occupies is 20 years older than Canada itself, and is the oldest building in Winnipeg. The building has a rich history, starting as the convent for the Grey Nuns in 1847, later serving as the first hospital in Western Canada.


CIUS Digital Archive Project website is launched

Developed in close cooperation with the University of Alberta Libraries and the Arts Resource Center, the Digital Archive Project of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) aims to digitize, systematize and describe the core publications of the institute that have been produced over the last 40 years – essentially, since its founding in 1976.


Stettler’s history book in limbo due to lack of volunteers

When president of the P&H Elevator Preservation Society, Stan Eichhorn and Jack Schultze decided to initiate and back the project – intrinsic to many small communities in Alberta, a history book recording and documenting our town – little did they know some of the stumbling blocks they would be facing.

East Coulee school Museum receives grant for roof

The East Coulee School Museum has received a grant that will help restore the roof of its building.

The East Coulee School Museum has been making steady progress in maintaining and refurbishing the recognized historical site. It was successful installing a new boiler to heat the facility and the next project for the organization is to replace the roof. 

British Columbia

B.C. marks Canada 150 with cultural legacies

TO mark the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Confederation, the Province is launching a funding program to celebrate B.C. communities and their contribution to Canada. The Government of British Columbia will invest $8 million in museums and heritage sites throughout the province.

Monument to Chinese unveiled in Cumberland

A commemorative monument unveiled today in the historic Cumberland Chinese Cemetery recognizes the contributions of Chinese Canadians to B.C.'s rich cultural, historical and economic mosaic. 

'Prestigious log house' added to heritage registry in Prince George

A "prestigious log house" and Dutch Colonial-style residence have been added to the City of Prince George's heritage register.

While the designation doesn't come with any protection for the buildings, it does draw attention to the homes' unique value, said Trelle Morrow, a retired architect and member of the Heritage Commission.

Taking a look at history of Okanagan soldiers

The Greater Vernon Museum & Archives’ first presentation of the 2017 Speaker Series is to be given by UBC Okanagan history professor Dr. Jim Wood. 

Wood has taught history at several post-secondary institutions across Canada and is a well-published military history writer, as well as an Army reserve officer in the British Columbia Dragoons.

Canada Stories this Week 

"Gretna Green" places for Canada 

I must credit J Paul Hawthorne, a genealogist from San Diego, for bringing this phenomenon to my attention – Gretna Green Marriage Places for North Americans, on his site at and it includes Canadians. This is something I did not know! 

Some of the places were New York, Erie, Buffalo; New York, Niagara for Ontario Canada; St. Lawrence, Ogdensburgh, New York for Ontario and Quebec, and Michigan, St. Clair, Port Huron for Lambton County, Ontario and all Ontario. 

So you should check these places in the United States if you have people in your family that you can't find their marriage records, they may have been married in the states! 

FamilySearch - More Free Historic Records 

FamilySearch has great planes for 2017! 

One of the six things to look for in 2017 will be “Over 330 FamilySearch digital camera teams worldwide will digitally preserve 125–150 million historical records in 2017 for free online access. Another 200 million images will be added from FamilySearch's microfilm conversion project that uses 25 specialized machines to convert its vast microfilm collection at its Granite Mountain Records Vault for online access. Over 30 percent of the 2.4 million rolls of microfilm have already been digitized and published online. The digital collections can be located in the FamilySearch catalog online and by perusing collection lists by location”. 

And they are doing the passenger lists, border crossings, and naturalization petitions, and I am interested to see these records. 

Be  sure to tell your friends about us!

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 09 January 2017

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Ice Storm 1998

05 January 1998 - The Ice Storm of 1998, caused by El Niño, hit southern Ontario and Quebec, resulting in widespread power failures, severe damage to forests, and a number of deaths.

(That day will live with me forever. I was awoken in the early morning by our dog to hear crashing noises as transformers blew. I went to the front door, and the sky was lit up by by the lights as the power went off, and the days of unrelenting freezing rain continued. We were without power for four days. And we went under another freezing rain alert again this past week and lost more limbs off of trees once again, including a big branch from our beautiful giant Fir.) 

Newspaper Articles 


Letter: Honouring Alcock and Brown 

On Saturday, June 14, 1919 British Royal Air Force officers Arthur Whitten Brown and John Alcock took off from a bumpy field in St. John’s, Newfoundland and soared into history as the first to fly the Atlantic Ocean non-stop. The takeoff site was christened “Lester’s Field” by Brown for the family that owned the property. 

Nova Scotia 

CFTA Tantramar Community Radio and the Tantramar Radio Players are taking to the airwaves to present The 1867 News. The show will begin later this month and feature daily newscasts from 150 years ago, when Canadians were preparing to enter into the federation known as Canada. 

A Canada 150 project from Annapolis Royal, N.S., weaving the rich history of the region into a traditional Scottish tartan has a Cochrane connection. 

Kimberly Gunn, who lived in Cochrane for 10 years before moving to Nova Scotia five years ago, has a strong link to the community. She and her husband come back to visit as often as they can, were bagpipers in the Cochrane Pipe Band, and Gunn continues to publish the Cochrane Visitors' Guide.

Neglect, corruption and the history behind Halifax's deadliest fire. 

The devastating fire broke out just before midnight at a Halifax institution, consuming everything in its path and taking the lives of 30 vulnerable people who had been asleep in their beds. 

More than a century later, a local author is delving into the shady history of the Halifax Poor House fire, which remains the deadliest blaze to ever occur in the city. 


From the archives: Awarding of a gold-headed cane to the first ship of the year started in the 1840s 

For most of Montreal’s long history, it was far different. Winter ice made the river impassable to sailing ships at least from mid-December to mid-April, and the advent of more powerful steam-driven ships in the middle of the 19th century didn’t extend the season by much.  

From the archives: Bonsecours was a market with style — and pretensions of grandeur — in 1847  

On Jan. 6, 1847, Bonsecours Market still was not finished. Sharp eyes could see workers’ tools and supplies lying about. The police station in one of the building’s wings and the weighing station in the other — “superseding the wretched looking place now occupied for that purpose,” as the Gazette put it — were far from complete. 

Have you ever dreamed of being the sheriff of an old-timey frontier town? Perhaps you’re looking for a place to hitch your wagon? Or maybe you just wished you lived like a pioneer? Well, for the tidy sum of $2.8 million, you can turn those fantasies into reality in southern Quebec.


Canadian symbols on display at Museum London

From the beaver and the moose to poutine and maple syrup, Canadian symbols will be on display at Museum London next week in preparation for the country's 150th birthday celebration.

The museum collected a host of artifacts, images and artwork that have become known as symbols of Canada's national identity, according to Amber Lloydlangston, the museum's curator of regional history.

Laid to rest: Identifying unknown Canadian soldiers who fell in battle in Europe

It was a construction crew working on a hospital expansion that first came across human remains in 2010 near the pastoral French town of Vendin-le-Vieil — remains that would later prove to be those of an unknown Canadian soldier.

Over the six years that followed, the remains of 18 more missing Canadians would be found in the same area, either in small groups or alone where they fell nearly a century earlier.

Project adds Indigenous names to Canadian history

They were called "Eskimo," "half-breed" or "squaw." The collection of photos of Indigenous people in the collections of Library and Archives Canada extends into the thousands — but often the Indigenous people in the photographs were not named, just labelled with words that sound offensive to modern ears.

Col. John McCrae gets the comic book superhero treatment

Col. John McCrae is teaming up with six other lions of Canadian history to help save the world in a new comic book.

The Guelph author of In Flanders Fields is the central character in a work of historical comic book fiction by a pair of Guelph residents titled Group of 7.

Canada to celebrate Tamil Heritage Month in January

Canada for the first time will celebrate the Tamil Heritage Month throughout January following its declaration by the Canadian House of Commons last year


History Matters: Grader operator unearths two ancient sites in Saskatoon landfill

It started out as a typical day for Charles Gowen, a heavy-equipment operator at the Saskatoon landfill. It was his job to scrape away dirt from a borrow pit and layer it over the trash. 

But on Sept. 1, 1977, when his grader had dug down about a metre, Gowen noticed that the colour of the soil was much darker, not its normal light sandy brown. Stopping to take a closer look, he found bone fragments and other organic material. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

New Year's Resolutions 

Well, have you made your New Years's Resolution, or do you call them something else, like goals for 2017? I prefer goals myself. I find that goals are more attainable, and I mention my goals in last week's newspaper what I hope to attain in 2017. 

I found that The Genealogy Weekly January 4 2017 from Boston has in its weekly survey resolutions for 2017, and the most popular was organizing research papers, files, and photographs; followed closely by sharing genealogical information with other members of my by family, and sharing family history with our younger generations of my family.

That sounds familiar, doesn't it? I wonder what the success rate will be?

Something new at the Library and Archives Canada

I received a blog post from the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) entitled Introducing LAC’s guest curator blog series and our upcoming exhibition! 

They tell us to watch the LAC website at because there will be new and exciting blog articles, and upcoming exhibition - Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? And this is in recognition of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation.

The exhibition opens on June 1, 2017, while the year-long blog series starts in January 2017.

The blog says that we will hear from the staff who helped develop the exhibition, including anecdotes about their work at LAC. The series also includes articles by scholars, experts and ordinary Canadians, who all depend upon LAC’s collection, from across Canada—and even the other side of the globe!

Visiting the exhibition

And be sure to visit the physical exhibition in downtown Ottawa where you can see these, and many other Canadian treasures, in person. Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? will be on display free of charge at the LAC headquarters at 395 Wellington Street between June 1, 2017, and March 1, 2018.

It sounds great and worth the visit.  

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

BTW, did you know that we celebrated our 9th blogiversary last week? We've been around since 02 January 2008! <>

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to

(c)2017 All rights reserved

Monday, January 2, 2017

Canadian Week in Review - 02 January 2017

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

John Cabot

It is written that John Cabot reached the island of Newfoundland, which he claimed for England, in December 1497. He was born c1450 and died c1500. 

To mark the Canadian celebration of the 500th anniversary of Cabot's expedition in 1997, the Canadian and British governments both accepted a widely-held conclusion that the landing site was at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland. 

Quebec City

The troops of Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold are defeated before Quebec City on 31 December 1755. 

Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold led a force of about 1,200 American army forces and Canadian militia in a multi-pronged attack on the city, which, due to bad weather (there was a blizzard) and bad timing, did not start well, and ended with Montgomery dead, Arnold wounded, and Daniel Morgan and more than 400 men captured. The battle was the first major defeat of the war for the Americans. 

Prince Edward Island Railroad

All rail service was terminated in Prince Edward Island after Canadian National Railway abandons its historic rail lines in the province. 

The railway ran from Tignish in the west to Elmira in the east, with major spurs in the capital in Charlottetown, Montague, and Georgetown and the original eastern terminus at Souris. 

The line officially closed on 31 December 1989, and the rails removed between 1990 and 1992.

Social Media

(Photos) Hants History: Dec. 26, 2016 edition

Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

Newspaper Articles 


The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum will tweet out its history as nation marks its 150th 

As Jan. 1 marks the start of sesquicentennial celebrations in Canada, it’s also a milestone date for those who safeguard Canada’s military heritage in London. 

Jan. 1, 1888 was the day the infantry school on Oxford Street was declared open, following two years of construction on a budget of $30,000. 

The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum plans to commemorate Canada’s 150th birthday year with tweets detailing 150 significant events in the RCR’s history. 

Black community celebrates Viola Desmond as new face on $10 bill 

Selecting Viola Desmond as the new face on the $10 bill will finally raise the national profile of Canada’s Rosa Parks. 

Many are familiar with Parks’ famous refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on an Alabama bus in 1955, an act that helped spark the civil rights movement in the U.S.

Students learn indigenous history by reenacting colonization in unique blanket exercise

Three dozen high school students in stocking feet wander quietly over colourful blankets spread across the floor. They are roaming their land. It is centuries ago, and they inhabit a vast place that will one day be known as Canada.

Cobourg 2017 events celebrate Canada 150

Canada 150 is becoming big news, as Jan. 1 of the nation’s sesquicentennial year draws near.

Cobourg is planning its own version, with an amazing string of 2017 events, thanks to its own Cobourg 2017 committee (co-chaired by Nicole Beatty and Peter Delanty).

Early Falconbridge films now at Sudbury archives

A few years ago, Charlie Stafford of British Columbia was researching the history of his hometown of Falconbridge, Ont., in the hopes of writing a book about the town.

While researching, he discovered the City of Greater Sudbury Archives, located in the heart of Falconbridge, and began encouraging former residents who were helping him with his book to donate records to the archives.


History Corner - Some immigrants to the Canadian West came from a well-to-do background 

The photo features Henri Rudolph Roosmale Nepveu — the man standing beside the horse, on his horse ranch near Yorkton in 1889. Henri, who was a banker in his native Netherlands, came to the Yorkton area in 1888, and within a year, had erected this log house and a horse ranch.

British Columbia

Royal B.C. Museum calls on Indigenous people to submit stories about relics

An Indigenous artist and writer says First Nations artifacts in museums are not simply cold, hard objects, but are rather the belongings of families and communities.

The Royal B.C. Museum in Victoria has brought in Francine Cunningham as the guest editor for the spring issue of its digital magazine, Curious, which will focus on Indigenous peoples' relationship to the museum's collections.

Cherryville artist seeks First World War internment camp stories

A Cherryville-based artist is seeking help in providing information and stories on a dark chapter in Canadian history.

Kerri Parnell is working with the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund to create a series of paintings for a travelling art exhibition that will depict the internment of Ukrainian and Eastern Europeans in Canada during the First World War.

Murals help heal scars of history

The dark past of internment in Vernon, which has long been buried under shame and guilt, is coming to life.

Between 1914 and 1920, more than 96,000 Ukrainians and Europeans living in Canada were imprisoned behind the barbed wire fences of internment camps. They were forced to work for free, carving out highways. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Social Media
Are you a social media person? Do you want to publicize the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) 2017 Conference? Then you should read the press release put out by the OGS last week. 

“Our goal is to help promote Canadian bloggers, social media gurus and the genealogy community. The official OGS Conference 2017 website will have a sidebar where your blog postings will be shared as they are posted. 

There will be a Social Media Team Haven at the conference where we can meet, write our blog entries and post to social media. You will be accredited with an official media tag, as well as get the chance to help promote one of the largest genealogy conferences in Canada”. 

Have you joined? My application is going in today!

If you are interested please send your name, blog name and URL, Twitter handle, and email address to:

Applications close on 20 January 2017. Notifications will be sent by 25 January 2017. 

The year 2017 is looking to be a great one, with all of the things going on in Canada, as our country celebrates its 150th birthday. 

As for myself, I look forward to finishing my Professional Development Certificate towards receiving my PLCGS certificate in 2018 from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies; entering my 7th year as editor of the Ontario Genealogical Society's journal, Families; and continuing on with my genealogical research business,, which will celebrate its 4th year in March.

So it will be a full year, and. hopefully, as successful as 2016!

Meanwhile, speaking of celebrations and successes, please be sure to tell your friends about us here at Our blog is celebrating its 9th blogiversary today!

With over 2,300 posts since the blog's inception on 02 January 2008, there is much to read. Simply use the search box located on the right side of the page to find your favourite tidbit(s) of news and resources on Canadian genealogy, history, and heritage.

Please take a moment to write us a quick note at to say "Hi!", to let us know about something that you or your group is doing, or even to suggest a good news tip we may have missed. We'd love to hear from you, our readers!

If you would like to subscribe for your e-copy of the latest blog post, please send your email to 

Wishing you and yours all the best for 2017!
Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2017 All rights reserved.