Friday, December 30, 2016

Happy New Year!

Are you ready for 2017? We think we are!

It will be an exciting year with Canada having its 150 year old anniversary of becoming a country, and we will be right in the center of it – here in Ottawa! 

And genealogically-speaking, the OGS Conference will be held here this year from June 16 to 18 at Ottawa's Algonquin College. So keep that on your calendar as something to attend. We will be there. 

May 2017 be the best ever!
Happy New Year!

Monday, December 26, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 26 December 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

Social Media  

(Video) Queens (Nova Scotia) seeking keeper for historic lighthouse

Want to operate a lighthouse? Here’s your chance — with a tourism twist.

It has been four centuries since Samuel de Champlain landed at the site of what is now the Fort Point Lighthouse, and the Region of Queens Municipality is looking for an entrepreneur to welcome modern-day explorers to the historic Liverpool beacon. 

Newspaper Articles 


Diving into the mysteries of WW II Bell Island shipwrecks

Memorial University archaeology student Daniel Rees, whose great-grandmother nursed the injured sailors, was awarded a JR Smallwood Foundation research grant to study the shipwrecks.'  

Heritage Foundation Launching Course to Conserve Untold History 

The Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador is launching a folklore and oral history interviewing course to help those interested in conserving the province's untold history. 

Nova Scotia 

Nova Scotians have the chance to shape a collection of 150 artifacts from across the province, put together to represent our region’s history in 150 years of Confederation. 

This uniquely Nova Scotian effort allows residents to curate a historical collection that truly represents who we are. 

Time capsule to be 'a snapshot' of the Halifax Explosion 

Ninety-nine years after the Halifax Explosion, with "virtually no survivors left," historian Janet Kitz wants people to bring forward their stories about the wartime accident that changed the city forever. 

Nova Scotia black history course a first in Dal's 198-year history

For the first time in its 198-year history, Dalhousie University in Halifax will offer a course about the black experience in Nova Scotia.

"Dalhousie really has never had a dedicated course to African-Nova Scotian history," said Isaac Saney, a Dalhousie history professor who developed, and will teach, the course. 

Sydney Mines Heritage Society struggling to maintain museums

Every year it’s a struggle for the Sydney Mines Heritage Society to keep its museums open, and this year is no different, according to curator Dr. Stuart Critchley. 

Prince Edward Island 

Feds putting up new buildings for World Acadian Congress

ACOA and Heritage Canada are putting up money to build new infrastructure in P.E.I.'s Evangeline region in preparation for the coming of the World Acadian Congress in 2019. 


Quebec diocese: On the cusp of change?

In many ways, the diocese of Quebec contains, in microcosm, the whole diversity of the Anglican Church of Canada, and the tensions and challenges that come with it.

While its headquarters are in Quebec City, the diocese includes the rural farmlands of the Eastern Townships, the fishing outports of the Lower North Shore, Gaspé and Magdalen Islands, the remote Naskapi community of Kawawachikamach in the northern part of the province, and the growing university city of Sherbrooke.


Naismith’s rules & the 10 most iconic moments in Canadian basketball history

Insulin. The zipper. The telephone. The electric wheelchair. The pacemaker.

Canada has been at the forefront of some of the most important innovations in modern history. Also: Basketball.

Canadian memories of First World War’s forgotten Christmas truces 

It was Christmas morning near Ypres, and the men of the Toronto Regiment were waking up in their chilled, fetid trenches.  

Swells of chlorine gas had floated across no man’s land a few days earlier. Shells and sharpshooters’ bullets before that. 

But on this mild Christmas Day, there was only the sound of young voices singing “The Maple Leaf Forever” — in German accents. 

LOCAL HISTORY: Ambassador for peace

The Huron made Huronia their home because it was a major crossroads in central North America. But they didn't blink at long journeys taken out of Huronia for trade, war, socializing, or diplomacy. 


Our History: A recipe book for Christmas, with a dash of history

If you were looking for a Christmas present in 1954, one suggestion was a ring-bound recipe book, which also contained short histories of many Manitoba co-operatives. 


History Matters: The baby in the Depression photograph

On Oct. 17, 2016, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix carried an obituary for 82-year-old Peter O. Fehr of Warman, Saskatchewan. 

Peter might not have been widely known, but in June 1934, he was captured on film — in his mother’s arms — in one of the most famous photographs in Canadian history. 

British Columbia

Royal BC Museum seeks stories from people in First Nations communities

The Royal BC Museum and Archives invites submissions from First Nations community members from across British Columbia for the 2017 spring issue of Curious

Canadian Stories this Week 

A Canadian Innovation 

Louis Kessler, a Winnipeg genealogist and a DNA person, has invented a genealogy tool titled the Double Match Triangulator (DMT). 

He explains it as a "combines two different people's Chromosome Browser Results files from FamilyTreeDNA to provide Double Match and Triangulation data that can be used to help determine genealogical relationships. It loads the results into an Excel file along with a colorful map that helps the researcher visualize the matches and help to identify Triangulation Groups made up of people who could share a common ancestor, helping you to map your DNA segments to your ancestors". 

And he has successfully entered the RootsTech Imnovtation Summit, and last week was chosen one of the semi-finalists. Good luck, Louis, we hope you win! 

The winners will be decided on Friday, February 10, 2017 and you can vote for the winner by using your phone.

For more information, go to

To read more about Louis's innovation , go to

To download a copy of his freeware program, go to

Growing Our Family 

There are six more days till the end of December to take advantage of Ontario Genealogical Society's half-price 2017 membership drive. They are offering full membership at $31.50 CDN. A great membership deal you don't want to miss. 

There are lots of extras – 

  • Free membership to FindMyPast, after you become a member 

  • Access to 34 OGS branches, and their Member's-Only webpages 

  • Access to the journal - Families 
  • Access to the newsletter – NewsLeaf  

  • And it goes on and on ...
If you want to become a member, go to 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Friday, December 23, 2016

Merry Christmas/Happy Holidays

Both Mario and I would like to wish everyone the very best of the Holiday, and the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) will be in your mail box Monday morning, as usual.
If you would like to receive the CWR in your mailbox, just subscribe to to be added to the mailing list.
Merry Chistmas and Happy Holidays!

Monday, December 19, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 19 December 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

First Newspaper in New Brunswick

On 17 December 1783, the first issue of the newspaper, The Royal Saint John Gazette and Nova Scotia Intelligencer, was printed for the first time.

You can access this newspaper on the New Brunswick Archives site at 

Thomas Chandler Haliburton

On 17 December 1796, Thomas Chandler Haliburton, a Nova Scotian author, judge, and politician, was born. 

He wrote the adventures of Sam Slick in the Clockmaker series that had first appeared in the Nova Scotia newspaper, the Novascotian

He later settled in England, and died there in 1865. 

For more information, you can go to

 Second World War

On 14 December 1944, during the Second World War, Canada called for conscription in fighting the war.

Prime Minister Mackenzie King called for the conscription of 16,000 more men, and this stirred up resentment and opposition in Quebec.

You can read about conscription in the newspapers of the day at

Social Media 

(Video) What are you at? Darryl Chislett's vintage model ships

Darryl Chislett of the Kilbride area of St. John's says building model ships requires a keen interest in history.

"A good model ship builder knows his time period, knows his history, knows how history affected [the ship]," said Chislett.

(Photos) Simcoe County history

One of the most famous explorers in Canadian history based one of his first major expeditions out of Huronia.

Samuel de Champlain was known for his map-making skills, his toughness, and his organizational skills, as well as his ability to remain optimistic during even the most trying times. In addition, unlike most Europeans, he was relatively progressive in his ideas about natives – as long as he saw them as allies.

Newspaper Articles

Nova Scotia

Desmond announcement uplifting for African Nova Scotians

Last week Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz announced that the first Canadian woman to be featured on the $10 bill would be Viola Desmond, a civil rights activist from Nova Scotia.

Exploring the Black experience in Nova Scotia

A new Dalhousie University course launching this winter will take students on a voyage through more than 400 years of African Nova Scotian history.

Dalhousie professor Isaac Saney says the course will help fill a gap for students interested in studying the African experience in Nova Scotia — a topic that also holds broader national significance.


From Chinese to Canadian: Archive Project documents the integration of Chinese immigrants into Canada's mainstream

From the beginning, Chinese immigrants to Canada had an arduous odyssey of grudging tolerance and outright racism as cheap (usually the cheapest) labour in the 1800s.

Rare views of Japanese-Canadian internment: 19 images remembering one of Canada’s darkest hours

Last week was the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Amid commemorations of the Americans killed in the attack, as well as the brutal war that followed, also came a solemn remembrance of how the United States interned coastal Japanese-American populations that it wrongly believed were a dangerous fifth column.

New register will help with Brooklin family history research

Genealogy is one of the biggest reasons people visit archives. This is true for archives as big as the Archives of Ontario and as small as the Archives at the Whitby Public Library. 

How a Canadian Invented Basketball

Unlike sports such as baseball, football and hockey that evolved slowly into the games fans know today—basketball sprung forth from a singular inventor’s imagination. Find out how a Canadian with just a pair of peach baskets, an old soccer ball and 13 typewritten rules invented one of America’s favorite pastimes, and find out how different the original sport was to the one played today.

Abhayjeet Singh Sachal wins prestigious Vimy Pilgrimage Award

ABHAYJEET Singh Sachal from Delta’s Seaquam Secondary School is among the 17 high school students and the only Indo-Canadian to have won the prestigious Vimy Pilgrimage Award. He will travel to Europe in April to learn about Canada’s First World War legacy and participate in the commemorations for the centennial of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.


From the Archives: Manitoba farmers vote to strike

The Western Producer takes a weekly look at some of the stories that made headlines in issues of the paper from 75, 50, 25 and 10 years ago. 


Clark wants committee to have final say on civic names

What’s in a name?

Saskatoon’s new mayor wants to change who has the final say on the city’s civic naming process to allow for better community representation in the names of city streets and facilities.

British Columbia

Finally, some respect for women in Canadian history

We have long failed to recognize the contributions of Canada’s women to our rich history, just as we have failed to recognize the contributions of many of our First Nations leaders.

Unique collection of rare artifacts reveals Vancouver's history

Pieces of people's lives, memories and experiences currently on display at the Museum of Vancouver are offering a rare century-old glimpse into the city's past.

The objects are part of the Major James Matthews collection, and they present a snapshot of what Vancouver was like before it was even incorporated.

Column: New banknote helps illuminate our history

I’m not sure what’s more disturbing: the fact I didn’t know who Viola Desmond was until last week, or that I was unaware that Canada had racially segregated movie theatres as recently as 1946. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

This Week in New Brunswick History 

Do you know that New Brunswick (Canada) has website devoted to putting the province's history online in a time line? 

For instance, this week there is 1873 right up to 1911. An example, it says that on the 23rd of December 1915, the “Collège de Caraquet” in Caraquet is destroyed by fire. 

And that's not all, you can search 2,271 historical images of New Brunswick by simply putting in a search word, say, the capital city of Fredericton. 

So to read more of what this site has to offer, go to 

Have you ever gone to the site OurDigitalWorld?

There are many older newspapers online that you should be aware of, and they are searchable. On their website, they say that they have the “Largest collection of Ontario Community Newspapers online, from 1810 to present day”.  

This month they have put on a complete set of newspapers from Clarington, Ontartio which now joins 150,000 pages from Orono, Bowmanvile!

And coming soon there will be more Kawartha Lakes 150,000 pages from Lindsay to Bobcaygeon and Omemee!

This is a fantastic place to go to when you need to read about your ancestor's lifes in the villages and towns in Ontario.

Their website is and to go directly to the newspapers, go to  

And that was the week in Canadian news!

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012!

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 12 December 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Statute of Westminster 

11 December 1931 - The British parliament passed the Statute of Westminster, giving Canada final standing as an independent country. The legislation applied to Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. 

The one exception, was Newfoundland, where Britain resumed direct rule as they did before 1931. That arrangement remained until Newfoundland became a province of Canada in 1949. 

Social History  

Historic courthouse becomes Hampton's new town hall  

After years spent sitting empty the old Kings County Courthouse is once again bustling with activity, as staff from the town of Hampton began moving into their new office quarters this week.  

At one point many feared the 145-year-old building would be demolished when the province closed it in 2013 without a buyer in sight. The municipality bought the historic structure for $1 and has been renovating it since earlier this year.  

Newspaper Articles 


Archaeologists examine Indigenous site dating back 2,200 years on Exploits River 

An archaeological dig has uncovered material that dates back more than 2,000 years on the Exploits River. 

Laurie Maclean, an archaeologist, and Don Pelley, dig assistant, spent two weeks in November sifting through mud, clay and dirt on the edge of the river in search of items that belonged to the Groswater Paleoeskimos. 

Nova Scotia 

Africville and the 1917 Halifax Explosion  

Shortly after 9 a.m. on Dec. 6, 1917 a vessel carrying munitions exploded in the Narrows of Halifax Harbour, devastating much of the north end of the city. Two popular myths have emerged from that event: Africville, a black neighbourhood on the shores of Bedford Basin, escaped destruction, sheltered by the heights of the Halifax peninsula; and, following the explosion, Halifax Relief authorities deliberately denied reconstruction aid to Africville. Although mutually-exclusive, neither myth bears close scrutiny. 

Some family history at Fort Gaspereau 

I am going to tell you a story that might or might not be true. 

I prefer to think that it is true since it fits what I know of my family tree. After all my grandfather, who was born in the mid 1800s, has a name on his birth certificate that you all will recognize, Charles Tupper MD. 

2 historic downtown Halifax buildings may be in private hands next year 

After years of sitting idle and as a potential hazard, the Nova Scotia government is hoping to sell the historic Dennis Building in downtown Halifax to a developer in the new year.

The minister responsible for the file, Labi Kousoulis, wants the issue settled as soon as possible. 

How civil rights icon Viola Desmond helped change course of Canadian history 

She's often described as "Canada's Rosa Parks."  but if anything, Rosa Parks is America's Viola Desmond. 

The civil rights icon and new face of the Canadian $10 bill refused to give up her seat in a whites-only section of a Nova Scotia movie theatre nine years before Parks's famous act of civil disobedience on a racially segregated bus in Montgomery, Alamba. 

HANTS HISTORY: Dec. 5, 2016 edition 

Here's a look  at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal


Timeworn Quebec City bridge could draw inspiration from Scottish twin 

Politicians have been trying to restore and repaint a historic Quebec City bridge, known as the Pont de Québec, for nearly a quarter of its 97 years of existence. 

Its almost identical twin in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the other hand, is sporting a new paint job.


New archive highlights years of racism faced by Chinese-Canadians 

Seventy-one years ago Mavis Chu Lew Garland and eight of her preschool classmates were photographed on the porch of the Chinese Canadian Institute on the corner of Dundas St. W. and University Ave. 

History: December 6, 1941 – War, spies, even James Bond 

The small isolated farm in southern Ontario was the perfect spot. 

It was the allied training camp for spies. 

Hindus worldwide laud proclamation of November as 'Hindu Heritage Month' by Ontario Legislature  

Commending Ontario legislature for passing the bill proclaiming November as "Hindu Heritage Month", Hindu community is urging the Canadian Parliament, other nine provinces, and three territories of Canada to do the same.  


History Matters: Asked for bread, given a stone; the 1910 Farmers' Siege of Ottawa 

In the summer of 1910, Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier embarked on a gruelling, two-month rail tour of western Canada. 

Officially, the visit would give the prime minister the chance to see first-hand how the region had changed so dramatically during his time in office. The more likely explanation, though, was that Laurier was genuinely worried about the rumblings coming from the farm community. 

And there was good reason. 


ANAVETS reveal memorial park project 

The ANAVETS revealed their plan for a memorial park dedicated to veterans of the Afghan War on Friday.  

The ANAVETS originally looked at placing the memorial at Veterans Park, but a land survey indicated the land used to be a 1950s high-water catch basin and to remediate would cost $1.5 million.  

The memorial park will feature a black marble cenotaph, a tank, and landscaping. 

British Columbia 

Kelowna cemetery first provincial site of Chinese-Canadian monuments 

A commemorative monument to honour the contributions of Chinese-Canadians to BC’s history, culture and economic prosperity has been unveiled in Kelowna.  

Cowley – A Village with History 

The story behind its toponym (name history) apparently has to do with F.W.Godsal a pioneer rancher in the Cowley area. This was not the towns first name however as it was originally known as French Flats, as most of the early (white) residents that came there were French in origin. Nouveau-Brunswick and Quebecois families with names like LaGrandeur and Barbeau settled in the area around 1882. 

Historians shrug as two prime ministers erased from Canadian banknotes 

Losing two of Canada's wartime prime ministers from the country's $50 and $100 bills won't be a step backwards for a country that has plenty to learn about itself, a pair of leading history buffs say.  


Canadian Jewish Heritage Month on table at Senate 

Canadian legislators have introduced a bill to designate the month of May as Canadian Jewish Heritage month. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Call for Proposals 

The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) has issued a Call for Proposals for its 23rd annual conference in Ottawa in September 2017. 

This year, they will highlight the genealogy of England and Wales family history, and Methodology, e.g., evidence analysis, genealogical proof standard, FAN (friends, associates and neighbours), and appraising the credibility of documents. 

For more information about submitting proposals, you can go to   

Deadline is January 31, 2017. 

New exhibit - The Canadian Museum of History and Library and Archives Canada 

A new exhibit, called Treasures From LAC Gallery, will be created within the Canadian Museum of History. 

The news story says that “ the gallery will showcase some of Canada's most historically significant documents from LAC's collections, making them more accessible to Canadians and enhancing public understanding of Canada's history and heritage.” 

So next time you are at the museum, be sure to check-out the CMH-LAC exhibit. 

Internet Archive raising funds for Internet Archive of Canada
I came across a friend's Facebook page the other day, and although she is an American genealogist, she had just made a donation to the Internet Archive, which, among other things, is going to host the Internet Archive of Canada. 

Not that that is a bad thing, but when you read the lead, it says “The Internet Archive is seeking donations to assist with the building of the Internet Archive of Canada in the wake of the Trump election”. 

What does the Trump election have to do with the Internet Archive of Canada??? 

If you read on, they say “The Internet Archive feels that this move is necessary in order to support their key mission: “to give everyone access to all knowledge, forever. For free.” We try to stay non-political here at Techaeris, but there is no telling what will transpire over the next four years with regards to net neutrality under a Trump presidency". 

So it appears that the Trump effect has made its way into Genealogy! Who knew? 

And that was the week in Canadian news!
This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe  

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, December 5, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 05 December 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

Black Rock  

01 December 1859 - Contractors Peto, Brassey and Betts, when they built the Victoria Bridge for the Grand Trunk Railway, erected a gigantic 30-ton block of black stone to serve as a memorial to 6,000 Irish immigrants, victims of a typhus epidemic, who died in fever sheds set up at Windmill Point, Montreal. 

Their remains were discovered in 1859 by workers on the bridge. Its inscription reads: "To preserve from desecration the remains of 6000 immigrants who died of ship fever A.D.1847-8 this stone is erected by the workmen of Messrs. Peto, Brassey and Betts employed in the construction of the Victoria Bridge A.D.1859".

Social History 

Photos - Township of Whitby Game Preserve has interesting history 

At the risk of being one month too early for the typical year-end summaries, I’d like to take this opportunity to say that 2016 was a big year for the archives at the Whitby Public Library. 

Newspaper Articles 


Photographer aims to capture Newfoundland's war history 

A French photographer, born near the site of an important First World War battlefield, is hoping to frame Newfoundland's connection to the site's military history. 

Mathieu Drouet, born in Monchy-le-Preux, is visiting Newfoundland to work on photos for a book documenting the connection between the province and his hometown. 

Historical items from Colonial Building being returned 

It's been 84 years since a large mob rioted and looted the Colonial Building in St. John's, and now with restoration of the building nearing completion, the Speaker of the House of Assembly is asking people to bring back items taken. 

No offers yet on Ryan Mansion 

The Ryan Mansion, one of the most famous homes in Newfoundland and Labrador, has been on the market for a month now, with a nibble here and there from potential buyers, but no sale.  

Nova Scotia 

When it comes to civic engagement, how much you know matters 

The other day, I was listening to a radio journalist interviewing young adults in Halifax about whether they were planning to vote in the civil election. 

For anyone like myself, who never fails to vote, the reasons people give for not voting continue to dismay me. An urban Canadian now has more means of learning what is going on than has had any society in human history. Yet, a man in his 20s was surprised, days before election day, that there even was an election! 

Boston's Christmas Tree Tradition Rooted In A Canadian Thank You 

Boston's official 2016 Christmas tree, like others that have come before it, is a thank you gift for events a century ago in the Nova Scotia's coastal capital city of Halifax.  

Plans proceeding to mark 100th anniversary of Halifax Explosion  

While the clock on Halifax City Hall stopped forever at 9:04 a.m. on Dec. 6, 1917, plans to commemorate the tragic explosion that stopped it are marching on. 

Annual ceremonies set for next Tuesday at 9:04 a.m. are just the beginning of a year’s worth of recognition of the historic impact, down through the generations, of the largest man-made explosion prior to the atomic bomb.

'Butterbox babies' maternity home survivors still search for birth families  

Every morning when Riva Barnett opens her bedroom closet she looks down at a small, wooden butter box that serves as a stark reminder of what could have been her fate.  

Had she not been adopted, she believes she would have been buried in a box just like it.  

Heritage advocates oppose pitch to demolish historic Halifax buildings  

The fight to preserve historic buildings in Halifax has erupted anew, this time on Barrington Street.

A prominent developer has applied to demolish two designated heritage properties in an area the municipality intends to make a heritage district.  

"This is an unfortunate application. It is unnecessary," said Andrew Murphy of the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia. 

New Brunswick  

Modern technology uncovers and displays old Miramichi photos 

With more than 40,000 photos, a Facebook group celebrating the history of Miramichi, N.B., is helping people who live in the region get a glimpse of the past. 

Group administrators Karl Wade and Charles Asoyuf started the group Our Miramichi Heritage Photo in 2012 and began adding a large collection of old pictures Asoyuf had been collecting for years. The group now has more than 8,000 members. 

Reprieve or replace? Meeting held to discuss damaged covered bridge 

Close to 150 people gathered in Hampton Monday night to hear the provincial government lay out a pair of options; repair or replace the 104-year-old Hammond River No. 2 covered bridge.  

The covered bridge was closed in October after an excavator working on the structure dropped through it because it was to heavy 

Doak House barn to be rebuilt

A historic barn in Doaktown will be rebuilt to honour its place in the province's history. 

The original barn, built by the Doak family in the 1820s, was demolished in June after structural damage and rotting deemed it too dangerous for further use. 


Italian Montrealers oppose removing storied artist’s name from park  

Montreal’s mayor is again facing criticism over changing the name of a city park — this time from members of the Italian community fighting to preserve the legacy of renowned local artist.  

A park in the city’s Hochelaga-Maisonneuve district named after late Italian-Canadian artist Guido Nincheri is expected to be renamed after Quebec City next year, where it will display several statues the city is gifting to Montreal in honour of its 375th birthday. 

Montreal's Guido Nincheri Park to keep its name following public outcry  

Following a public outcry, the city has decided to keep the name of artist Guido Nincheri on an east-end park. 

The park was slated to be renamed "Parc de la Ville de Quebec" for Montreal's 375th anniversary next year. 

Guido Nincheri Park, located at Rachel Street and Pie-IX Boulevard, got its name at Montreal's 350th anniversary. 

Spirit Lake interpretive center breaks visitor attendance record 

Award-winning Spirit Lake Internment Interpretative Center, celebrating its sixth successful year, continues to welcome many visitors to its museum. This year’s summer tourist season broke previous summer records, with over 4,000 coming to the center. Since 2011 over 30,000 have walked through the center to learn about the area, the unjust internment at Spirit Lake – the second-largest internment site in Canada – and about early 20th century Ukrainian immigrant history to Quebec. 


Third Avenue United Church named heritage property  

An iconic downtown church has been designated a heritage property. 

Saskatoon city council approved naming Third Avenue United Church a municipal heritage property at a meeting Monday.  

The Tyndall stone church, which sits at the corner of Third Avenue and 24th Street East, was built prior to the First World War. 

Dusting off the history of drought on the Canadian Prairies in the 1930s 

The dustbowl years on the Canadian prairies live on in the imaginations and landscapes of Western Canadians. 

Elderly survivors might still leave teacups upside down on saucers, as they did in the 1930s when dust settled everywhere in a household. Treebelts hastily planted on farms to reduce wind erosion have now become mature stands. In southern Saskatchewan, when a dry spell stretches over two seasons, farmers begin to scour again their holdings. Well aware of what happened in the 1930s, they look for the “hardpan” emerging from soils starting to shift and blow on their land.  

The dustbowl of the 1930s might have ended over eighty years ago, but many western Canadians still watch for its return.  


Brandon University to save MPE archives  

A huge collection documenting the entire history of Manitoba Pool Elevators is being put in order through a project at Brandon University’s (BU) S.J. McKee Archives.  

Conventional tractors attracted attention, too 

The 1916 Brandon tractor demonstrations attracted a lot of conventional tractors along with the three wheelers. 

British Columbia

Vancouver Chinatown residents share dreams for their neighbourhood 

The future of Vancouver's Chinatown is at a crossroads. 

What started as a ghetto in the late 19th century for incoming Chinese immigrants quickly grew into one of the largest most vibrant Chinatowns in North America. 

South Asian heritage learning tools receive boost from B.C. Government 

The B.C. government has awarded the Indus Media Foundation a one-time grant of $248,500 to share South Asian heritage through exhibition displays and learning tools intended for B.C. schools and community spaces. 

Local historian honoured by Governor General in Ottawa

Oak Bay’s Merna Forster has been honoured with the Pierre Berton Award for popularizing Canadian history. 

In a ceremony at Rideau Hall, Gov-Gen. David Johnston presented Forster with a medal and a $5,000 cash prize. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Our Canada - Your Family - Building a Nation,

As the time approaches for Ontario's annual conference to be held from 16-18 June 2017 at Algonquin College, Ottawa, Ontario called Our Canada - Your Family - Building a Nation, they have released the latest in the attractions that will be available to attendees and some of them are - 

Banquet Speaker and Lecturer: Hear from D. Joshua Taylor, nationally recognized genealogical author and host of the popular PBS series, Genealogy Roadshow

Excursions: Join us for four separate Research Excursions to local sites and repositories. 

Friday Workshops: Six concurrent workshops are available, with topics ranging from "Developing your Technology Toolkit" to "Using Family Reconstruction to Break Down Brick Walls". 

Exciting Program: A total of 28 lectures spread over the weekend including themes such as Canada, Ontario, The Provinces, and DNA 

Special Events: British Pub Night, First Timers' Gathering, Fast Trax mini lectures, Research Room, Ask an Expert and more! 

Ancestry Day: As an extra Bonus Day, Ancestry will be hosting a full day of talks from Ancestry Experts. 

Canada's 150 Birthday! 

Are you getting ready? Do you want to be in Ottawa when the anniversary of Canada'a 150 birthday celebrations start the 1st of January? 

Then you should be at Parliament Hill on December 31 when there will be entertainment, and fireworks to kick off 2017! 

The evening will begin at 7 p.m. with a Peace Tower Carillon concert, followed by a national ceremony attended by dignitaries and Olympic and Paralympic athletes, among others. The talented Julie Nesrallah will sing the national anthem. 

At precisely 8:17 p.m., a spectacular pyro-musical display will light up the sky of Canada's Capital Region with fireworks launched simultaneously from Nepean Point, Alexandra Bridge and Parliament Hill. The fireworks will be accompanied by Canadian music that will transport the audience through time and revisit different historical eras of our country over the past 150 years. There will be different spots in Gatineau and Ottawa offering a great view of the fireworks, including the Canadian Museum of History and Major's Hill Park. 

Starting at 9 p.m., Acadian duo Radio Radio will rock the main stage at Parliament Hill with their signature Chiac electro-rap sound. The festivities will continue at 10 p.m. with Alberta country singer Brett Kissel entertaining the crowd. Grammy- and Juno-nominated, multi-platinum singer-songwriter and recording artist Carly Rae Jepsen will close out the show before the countdown to 2017 and the traditional fireworks display. The British Columbia native is sure to bring people of all ages to their feet to properly kick off the New Year. 

It sounds as if it will be something to see. If the fireworks were as great as they were this past Canada Day, it will be something to see. We sat and watched them in between the rain drops, and were entertained immeasurably. 

If you can't be in Ottawa that evening, memorable events celebrating the 150th anniversary of Confederation will be held in 18 other urban centres on December 31: St. John's, Charlottetown, Halifax, Fredericton, Moncton, Québec City, Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria, Whitehorse, Yellowknife, and Iqaluit. 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012!

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe  

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 28 November 2016

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Sir Clifford Sifton 

In 1874, Sit Clifford Sifton was named the Minister of the Interior, with the task of filling the Prairies with settlers. And fill them he did! 

After the 1885 Northwest Rebellion led by Louis Riel was put down, settlers began to pour into Alberta. Around 1890, about 600,000 Americans moved to Saskatchewan and Alberta, where the farming frontier flourished from 1897-1914. Other Canadians, as well as British, German, and Ukrainian immigrants, also went Out West. 

Social History

There are no articles this week. 

Newspaper Articles 

Nova Scotia 

Mi'kmaq chiefs accept N.S. premier's apology for 'conquered people' legal brief 

Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq chiefs have accepted an apology from Premier Stephen McNeil for a controversial government legal brief that implied members of a First Nation band are a conquered people. 

McNeil made the apology Thursday during a meeting between chiefs and the provincial cabinet at the Nova Scotia Archives.

Prince Edward Island 

New Mi'kmaq name for Bonshaw Provincial Park trail 

The main trail at Bonshaw Provincial Park has a new name. 

The Ji'ka'we'katik Trail will be the main connection to the four-season trail system that covers 25 kilometres in the park. The name means "the place where bass are plentiful" and is the traditional Mi'kmaq name for the West River.  


The (almost) lost history of Canada's cinematic birthplace  

Last Thursday, a fire unfortunately destroyed The Robillard, a historic 19th-century building in Montreal's Chinatown district. As a heritage building, the Robillard certainly lived up to the designation with its historical significance: it was the birthplace of cinema in Canada. 

‘Montreal’s Michelangelo’ to disappear from park to make way for statues donated by Quebec City  

Guido Nincheri was one of Canada’s greatest religious artists, described as Montreal’s Michelangelo. But as the city prepares to celebrate its 375th anniversary next year, the administration is erasing Nincheri’s name from an east-end park to instead honour the provincial capital. 

Montreal museum confirms location of city’s first European settlement 

After years of research, officials at Montreal’s archaeology and history museum say they’re now able to pinpoint the precise location of the city’s first European settlement. 


Historic military aircraft recognized with tribute at Jackson Park 

The Essex Memorial Spitfire Committee donated three mounted signs to the City of Windsor to honour and provide historical significance of military aircraft located at Jackson Park.  

Rare cigar box lights up Jumbo exhibit at Elgin County Museum  

Referred to of late as "the Holy Grail of St. Thomas artifacts," a smoking piece of history has now returned to the city, if only temporary. 

At a short ceremony Friday afternoon at the Elgin County Museum, a rare cigar box that once housed Jumbo-brand stogies from the Honsinger cigar factory on Talbot Street was returned to St. Thomas for public viewing. 

Eye Candy: 1918 McLaughlin Buick 

I had always thought it would be great to own an antique car with a wooden steering wheel, and when I heard through word of mouth there was a 1918 McLaughlin Buick stored in a garage in Colbourne, I knew it was just the vehicle I was looking for. 

Chinese Canadian Archive Project - What's New? 

The Chinese Canadian Archive will collect and preserve documents, photographs and memorabilia which reflect the rich heritage of the Chinese Canadian community in Toronto. Please join us to learn more about this exciting project. 

Feature: Siegel was deeply involved in Toronto’s early community 

When Ida Lewis Siegel turned 90, Canadian Jewish Congress official Ben Kayfetz wrote an article celebrating her many accomplishments within Toronto’s Jewish community, noting that she had devoted her life to the community’s welfare and that she was still in possession of an impressive memory.  


The thrill of the find: Saskatoon's metal detectives unearth pieces of history  

Yasha Rassi kneels on the ground in Buena Vista Park after his metal detector goes off, his two friends, John Cave and Walt Degenstein, in the distance. 

British Columbia 

B.C. First Nation celebrates return of artifacts from Royal B.C. Museum  

A five-metre-wide painted wood screen and 37 hand-carved birds are among a collection of artwork returned to a First Nation after more than a century in the Royal B.C. Museum 

Some old favourites coming back to B.C. Highways 

The Ministry of Transportation has some great news for people who love B.C.’s roadside heritage: the ministry is rejuvenating, and adding to, the iconic Stop of Interest signs around the province. And in an interview with The Journal, Transportation Minister Todd Stone said that the province is also bringing back the Garbage Gobblers, the bug-eyed creatures that guarded garbage cans beside B.C. highways for many years. 

B.C. marks 100-year milestone of limited female suffrage 

The B.C. government is celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the right to vote being extended to some women, although full voting rights for all women would not happen until decades later. 

A century ago, using petitions, speeches and marches, suffragettes argued women deserved a voice and a chance to influence their country. 

Historical society receives blast from the past 

The Devon Historical Society recently received a new item for its display, one that flashes back to the earliest days of Devon.  

Canadian Stories this Week 

Blogging at the LAC 

Five years ago, blogging was unheard of at the Library and Archives Canada, and then it all changed. 

They have produced 650 blog posts, and I look forward to hearing about their collection each time a post is published.

Cyber Monday is here, so take advantage of the savings to send in your research question or brick wall about your Canadian ancestor.

Cross-border migrations a specialty.

Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services ( offers free, no-obligation consultations, and—for a limited time—a 15% discount on research work commissioned from the Consultation Report.

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And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.